Cinema Details

Paramount Cinema (Wellington City) CLOSED 25 September 2017

Contact Details
Address:
25 Courtenay Place

Wellington City
Map

Contact Person: The Manager (Stephen Ferguson) dm@paramount.co.nz or 04 384 4488
Phone: 04 384 4080
Fax: 04 384 4408
Mobile:

Website: http://www.paramount.co.nz

Details
Capacity: The Brooks 44 + The Bergman 60 + The Paramount 420
Screen: Three. DCP and 35mm. No 3D
Sound: Dolby digital
Seating: Couches in The Brooks,comfy armchairs in The Bergman and a mix of newer seating and older flip-up seats in The Paramount
Snackbar: Liquor licence in The Paramount Bar, with local wines and beers. An ninteresting icecream selection.
Accessibility: lift from street level. Otherwise ok.
Linked Article:

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Geoff's Review
With its claim to be Wellington's oldest cinema (established August 1917) and the first cinema to show talkies in New Zealand in November 1927 (although the Kings Theatre in Stratford makes a similar claim), the Paramount has long been part of Wellington film culture. With its central position in the cafe/entertainment precinct of Courtenay Place, it is the cinema to go to see art house films--some of which are more challenging than the usual fare eg Lars von Trier's four-hour-long Nymphomaniac (Vol I & II) was screening in April 2014.
It has a certain knock-about charm (exposed beams and brick-work) which appeals to the hipster sensibility and it really comes alive at film festival times (the July NZIFF and other specialist festivals) but also draws an older and discerning film audience.
The Courtenay Place entrance is rather modest and easy to miss but there are treasures to be discovered inside.
Sometimes hosts live music and other events.

The Paramount also hosts the thriving Wellington Film Society's Monday (6.15pm) screenings, March to November. See: www.filmsocietywellington.net.nz

September 2017 update: after months of uncertainty, the historic Paramount Cinema had its last screening of September 25. Its closure was not for lack of patronage nor without deep regrets for Wellington film-goers. It appears to have been more to do with inner-city development (or destruction?), coupled with its overseas owners' reluctance to make structural improvements.
A loss for film-goers, for the Wellington Film Society, and for Wellington.